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IMHO: Drinking On The Job

While everyone likes to believe they can hold their liquor, a microphone plus a Manhattan (or two) is a sure recipe for DJ mush- mouth – or worse: DJ mush-brain (“What did that DJ just say about the bride?”). While this is not about preaching temperance, there’s no disputing the fact the behavior of some DJs reflects on all DJs.

All to often we hear brides and reception hall owners comment, “The DJ spent more time at the bar then he did in his booth.” So, while the bride, groom and guests are fully entitled to get as schnockered as they please, it’s always best for the DJ to stay sane and sober.

Bonus tip: One of my most respected business mentors told me very early in my career: “Never allow your photo to be taken with a drink in your hand.”

That said, here’s a bit more on the subject from a recent Facebook post by Mark Ferrell. Mark, and hi wife Rebecca, are the creators of the MarBecca Method, which is designed to help Wedding DJs give their clients the performance they expect and deserves.

 

DJ_Drunk_FerrellFrom Mark’s post:

Question posted by a DJ: “I’ve found that usually after setup, once the function gets started, the venue staff will offer me a drink. I always have a few drinks when I’m DJing, I feel it helps me be on the same wave length as the crowd, and that’s what I was taught when I first started doing functions. Tonight though, the venue manager looked absolutely disgusted when I asked for a beer. What are your thoughts? And does it matter what type of function it is?”

Mark’s reply: What if this was said by a doctor? “I’ve found that usually after I get scrubbed, once the surgery gets started, the anesthesiologist will offer me some anesthesia. I always have some anesthesia when I’m operating, I feel it helps me be on the same wave length as the patient, and that’s what I was taught when I first started doing operations. Tonight though, the chief surgeon looked absolutely disgusted when I asked for some laughing gas. What are your thoughts? And does it matter what type of surgery it is?”

Drinking alcohol does a number of things that will impair your ability to act proficiently as a DJ and Master of Ceremonies. Clinical studies have been done on proficiency and motor skills under the influence of alcohol.

It slows brain activity and slows reaction time – both which are needed to mix, choose music, and read a crowd. It’s a diuretic, which harms your ability to speak clearly. Audiences need to understand you, as a Master of Ceremonies, otherwise why have one? And it impairs judgement – you don’t make good decisions.

When someone is paying you to perform at their important events, they need to trust that you are at 100% operating level. If you think drinking makes you better, you’re drunk.

 

Mark_FerrellNote: Mark Ferrell is scheduled to be one of the featured speakers at the 2015 Mobile Beat DJ Show in Las Vegas

 

 

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Max Lauder

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